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Hfile.FlushFileBuffers function (fileapi.h)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Latest updates.HFile (Apache HBase SNAPSHOT API)

 

A basic level HBase architecture where the tables exist in physical form is what we call HFile. Some key points in HFile: A primary identifier is a Row key. Here in lexicographical order, keys are ted Reading Time: 4 mins. Looking to download safe free versions of the latest software, freeware, shareware and demo programs from a reputable download site? Visit FileHippo today. If the file is present at the path, returns. // a handle to it without delete permissions to block an attacker from swapping the file. // to verify they are the same file. If they are different, the file is a soft link. // Open a handle without the reparse point flag to get the final path in case it is a soft link.

 

Hfile.FlushFileBuffers function (fileapi.h) – Win32 apps | Microsoft Docs

A basic level HBase architecture where the tables exist in physical form is what we call HFile. Some key points in HFile: A primary identifier is a Row key. Here in lexicographical order, keys are ted Reading Time: 4 mins. Nov 25,  · HFILE is a specialized handle, although defined as signed 32bit number to be able to get value There are other specialized handles, like HACCEL, HBITMAP, HINSTANCE, etc., all defined as a dependence to HANDLE. If the file is present at the path, returns. // a handle to it without delete permissions to block an attacker from swapping the file. // to verify they are the same file. If they are different, the file is a soft link. // Open a handle without the reparse point flag to get the final path in case it is a soft link.
 
 
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Reads occur at the position specified by the file pointer if supported by the device. This function is designed for both synchronous and asynchronous operations. For a similar function designed solely for asynchronous operation, see ReadFileEx. A handle to the device for example, a file, file stream, physical disk, volume, console buffer, tape drive, socket, communications resource, mailslot, or pipe.

The hFile parameter must have been created with read access. This buffer must remain valid for the duration of the read operation.

The caller must not use this buffer until the read operation is completed. A pointer to the variable that receives the number of bytes read when using a synchronous hFile parameter. ReadFile sets this value to zero before doing any work or error checking. Use NULL for this parameter if this is an asynchronous operation to avoid potentially erroneous results. For an hFile that supports byte offsets, if you use this parameter you must specify a byte offset at which to start reading from the file or device.

For an hFile that does not support byte offsets, Offset and OffsetHigh are ignored. To get extended error information, call the GetLastError function. For more information, see Remarks. If part of a file is locked by another process and the read operation overlaps the locked portion, this function fails. Accessing the input buffer while a read operation is using the buffer may lead to corruption of the data read into that buffer.

Applications must not read from, write to, reallocate, or free the input buffer that a read operation is using until the read operation completes. This can be particularly problematic when using an asynchronous file handle. Additional information regarding synchronous versus asynchronous file handles can be found in the Synchronization and File Position section and in the CreateFile reference topic.

Characters can be read from the console input buffer by using ReadFile with a handle to console input. The console mode determines the exact behavior of the ReadFile function. For more information, see CreateFile. When reading from a communications device, the behavior of ReadFile is determined by the current communication time-out as set and retrieved by using the SetCommTimeouts and GetCommTimeouts functions.

Unpredictable results can occur if you fail to set the time-out values. For details see File Buffering. The remainder of the message can be read by a subsequent call to the ReadFile or PeekNamedPipe function. For more information about pipes, see Pipes. For a code example that shows you how to test for end-of-file, see Testing for the End of a File. File Management Functions. Feedback will be sent to Microsoft: By pressing the submit button, your feedback will be used to improve Microsoft products and services.

Privacy policy. Skip to main content. Contents Exit focus mode. ReadFile function fileapi. For more information, see the Remarks section. Is this page helpful? Yes No. Any additional feedback? Skip Submit.

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